Chu nom writing a cover

Ch? nom t? di?n

Another con is that processing speed goes down, because each character is of variable length--moving six characters to the left will not be backtracking twelve bytes or whatever, but a variable amount. On the other hand, this would also create a cottage industry of "Chinese spellchecking" software. Plane 1, but not encoded yet. A society without classical Chinese? Look at the Tokugawa samurai. But that same wiki article stated that those who learned chu nom generally studied Confucius, an education which would likely include the study of classical Chinese. To my knowledge, no Japanese kokuji has ompu indicating native pronunciation. Government documents and writing was done in Wakan Konko Bun, which is a far step from what I view as 'kanbun' annotated classical Chinese , which the neo-Confucian scholars and the sengoku monks before them wrote in. This system appears exclusive to Vietnamese. Were they setting up the vernacular chu nom writings for later generations? For one thing, the precomposed hangul syllables in Unicode damn their waste, as there are some that do not occur in the language at all do not include any combinations that occur in medieval hangul such as those using archaic letters, like half-sios [z]. I made a typo in my first post on this thread. For example, the number of components necessary for Han characters is in the hundreds, and that doesn't take into account positioning within the character. So all you get is Gothic, Deseret, etc.

I made a typo in my first post on this thread. The interesting thing is the phonetic indicators exist to tell the Vietnamese pronunciation, which coincidently matches the Chinese pronunciation.

Repeat that for every other component, and then also reserve some bits for positioning.

h?c ch? nom

But as James said for the flexibility of being able to create characters naturally like people have always done, a decomposed encoding allows for unusual hangul combinations. Another con is that processing speed goes down, because each character is of variable length--moving six characters to the left will not be backtracking twelve bytes or whatever, but a variable amount.

So what were they trying to accomplish?

Chu nom translation

So all you get is Gothic, Deseret, etc. Plane 1, but not encoded yet. Basic rule is you write in hangul until Sino-Korean vocabulary, which you would write in hanja. Government documents and writing was done in Wakan Konko Bun, which is a far step from what I view as 'kanbun' annotated classical Chinese , which the neo-Confucian scholars and the sengoku monks before them wrote in. And the knowledge of a bunch of Chinese Characters does not mean one can read classical Chinese. For example, the number of components necessary for Han characters is in the hundreds, and that doesn't take into account positioning within the character. About fonts--the decomposed method has been done before. I'm not sure how the powers define contact with the user community. Another con is that processing speed goes down, because each character is of variable length--moving six characters to the left will not be backtracking twelve bytes or whatever, but a variable amount. Like for Han characters, that method of encoding hangul would take up more space, because one is encoding each individual letter, and thus every possible combination as a sequence of "letters" , whereas with a method that encodes the precomposed units, only the possible ones are accepted and space is not wasted. But it seems they certainly want more than just people who know something about it, but don't actually use it. But Kass' Code only has Plane 1, not Plane 2. But the Ho Dynasty quote I provided sounds like the Vietnamese were trying to develop a Confucian society independent of Chinese influence. It's called "johab", and the fonts are very small, since you only need the individual letters in the few various positions upper left, bottom, etc. Look at the Tokugawa samurai.

My point is I don't picture scribes bilingual in classical Chinese and vernacular translating for Vietnamese who could read ONLY vernacular, because I'm under the impression that the later demographic didn't exist during that time. But for modern use, people have switched to the precomposed encodings For example, the number of components necessary for Han characters is in the hundreds, and that doesn't take into account positioning within the character.

sawndip

Were they setting up the vernacular chu nom writings for later generations?

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Chu nom Characters